Archive for the ‘Surnames’ Category

John Heber – Hard Labour

Posted: May 9, 2012 in Heber

As I am not going back to work until the end of May, one of the things I know I need to do is to clean up my back room where my computer and my family history stuff are. I’ve got a couple of piles of paper and research I’ve done over the last year or so that I haven’t really done much with.

So, with this in mind to clean up, I started yesterday to go through the information and record the information into my Legacy Database and to scan any documents and attach them to the appropriate person. I was going really well until this afternoon, when I came across a page from the May 1880, Police Gazette of listing a ‘return of Prisoners tried’. The last entry on the page was for a John Heber ‘inflicting grievous bodily harm’ to Paul Heber (his father). John was sentenced to 6 months Hard Labour in Maitland Gaol. I recorded the details in the database but I thought I would check Trove out to see if there was a newspaper article about the incident. There was and more.

I note here that John Heber was married to Ellen McCormack, my maternal great grandmother’s sister.

The first thing I saw when I searched Trove was reports from various papers in April 1903 of ‘Attempted Wife Murder’, ‘Sensation at Maitland’, ‘The Pelaw Main Sensation’.  I’ll write a separate post about what occurred in 1903.

Prior to the 1880 incident there appears to be a number of incidents involving John and his family.

From various other newspaper articles:

The Maitland Mercury & Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 – 1893) Saturday 3 May 1873

 ‘A Jeremiah Boland, on the same day, was charged with having assaulted a boy named John Heber, at Oswald, near Lochinvar, on the 27th April.

John would have only been 13 at the time.  Jeremiah was also charged with assaulting Margaret Heber (John’s mother), as well as destroying certain fencing, the property of Paul Heber (Husband of Margaret & father to John).

Three years after the above incident, Paul Heber, John’s father posted the following add in the Maitland Mercury on the 27th July 1876

ANY PERSON EMPLOYING OR HARBOURING MY SON, JOHN HEBER, who is under age, will be PROSECUTED as the law directs, PAUL HEBER, Luskintyre North Vineyard.

On the 29th January 1874 a Michael Boland was charged “with having violently assaulted one Paul Heber, at Luskintyre. This report is rather long and if you want to read – you can do so by reviewing the report here.

The Maitland Mercury & Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 – 1893)

Tuesday 22 June 1880

UNLAWFULLY WOUNDING.  

John Heber surrendered to his bail on the charge that he did, at Luskintyre, on the 3rd day of May, feloniously, unlawfully, and maliciously wound one Paul Heber with intent thereby then to do him some grievous bodily harm.

Prisoner pleaded not guilty, and was defended by Mr. R. A. Youag.

Mr. C. G. Heydon prosecuted for the Crown and opened the case to the jury.

From the evidence it appeared that the prosecutor and the prisoner, who was his son, were not on friendly terms, and Heber had prohibited his son from coming to his house. Between 7 and 8 o’clock on the evening of the 3rd of May last in consequence of something the prosecutor’s daughter had told him, he went outside of his house at Luskintyre and saw the prisoner  outside the back door. Prosecutor asked the prisoner what he wanted. The latter, who had a stick in his hand, replied that he would b-soon let him know.

Prisoner asked for his clothes, which prosecutor had previously thrown out. Heber told his son that he had thrown his clothes out on the wood-heap. Prisoner replied ” You b—— German b——, I’ll break your b——– jaw, like you had it broken before.” Prosecutor went back into the house and, got a stick or axe-handle, and afterwards went back and returned with a gun in his hand. He held the gun by the barrel, and made a kind of a shove ,at prisoner witfy the butt of it. Prisoner took the gun out of Heber‘s   hand, and then struck him over the head with   the stick he held in his hand, the blow causing Heber to fall on to the ground. Heber was afterwards carried into the bedroom, and was laid up for a fortnight or so. He was attended by Dr. R. J. Pierce during his illness. The prosecutor admitted that he had taken a quart of wine from dinner time that day up to the time of the assault, and was rather excited. About six or seven years ago he was bound over to keep the peace towards a person named Boland. Prisoner did not hit him with a stick until he struck or shoved the prisoner with the gun. Prosecutor also admitted that he was reputed by some to be a quarrelsome man when in liquor. Prisoner was turned out for being disobedient and refusing to work. Another version of the affair given by John Heber, another of prosecutor’s sons, was that the prisoner and prosecutor seemed to be hitting at each other before the prisoner struck his rather with the stick. This witness also admitted that he had been turned out of the house on four or five occasions, and the prosecutor was a pretty violent man when in liquor. Witness’s father and mother quarrelled, and sometimes Heber turned his wife out, and sometimes she left of her own accord. Similar admissions were made by prosecutor’s daughter.    

The prisoner was in the habit of coming to the house for his clothes, which were washed there. When Dr. Pierce saw the prosecutor about three hours after the assault, the latter was insensible, and his eyes were bunged up. There were two large wounds on the fore- head, one, a straight wound, about three and half inches long, running from his hair to the nose ; and the other, a semi-circular wound, about two and a half inches long. Both wounds were completely cut to the bone, and were bleeding freely, his clothes being saturated with blood -, one of the front teeth was also broken. The doctor was of opinion that there must have been more than one blow to have inflicted the injuries described. Prisoner after the arrest told the constable that the prosecutor had struck at him with a gun, and asked his brother to go down to a stump in the paddock and get the gun which his father had broken over him. Prisoner had the stick in his hand before his father came out.

Mr. Young addressed the jury for the de- fence He submitted that what the prisoner did was done in self-defence. On the occasion of the assault the prisoner went to the house as he was in the habit of doing to see after his clothes which his mother had washed for him, when he was attacked by the prosecutor, who admitted that he struck the prisoner with the gun before the latter had struck him. The quarrels between prosecutor and the prisoner arose through the latter always stepping in and protecting his mother from the violence of   the prosecutor.

At one o’clock the jury retired to consider their verdict, at twelve minutes past one they returned into court with a verdict of guilty of unlawfully wounding, with a recommendation to mercy on account of circumstances of aggravation. His Honor said he would take into consideration the fact that it was the prisoner’s first offence, and also the recommendation of the jury, and inflict a lighter sentence than he would under other circumstances. Prisoner was sentenced to be imprisoned in Maitland gaol for six months with hard labour.

I wonder sometimes at people who say I’ve researched my family history. Have they really? A comment I received recently said ‘ my surname’s blah’, so I must be connected to your tree! I don’t think so. How would you know if you aren’t prepared to do the hard work? Other’s find information and think that what they find is gospel and correct. Sometimes it is, sometimes it’s not. Recently I found a photo of a house on someone’s tree on Ancestry that apparently was the house of one of my ancestors. I contacted them to ask where the house was, the name of it and what evidence did they have to say it belonged to this said couple. This person has not bothered to reply so I can’t help but wonder, is it correct, did they find it on someone else’s tree and just copied over without thinking? Why bother uploading something and not be prepared to show the evidence.

Way back when I first started doing my family history (where talking 1988 here by the way), the only way to research was go to the library and then spend weeks waiting for that certificate or other piece of information to be snail mailed to you.  These days, it’s quite easy to find information on the internet somewhere but what if that piece of information you found is ‘wrong’?

Back in the old days, I spent a great deal of time at the local library, basically because that’s where you went to do your research and then when you found something, weeks would go by before you had that little piece of evidence that either proved it right or wrong.

When I first started researching my beloved grandmother’s family history many years ago, it was without the advantages (or maybe disadvantages) of today’s technology.  My grandmother had the details of her parents, she had their birth, death and marriage certificates, which back then was a gold mine, considering that they were married and born in South Australia. Living in NSW, it’s a little hard to do family history research in another state, though it is a little easier now. Their marriage certificate showed that my great grandmother’s father was George Honney Harris.  Her birth certificate showed her parents as George Honey Harris and Rose Ann Harris. With this information I was able to look up the SA BDM index’s and find the marriage. After obtaining the marriage certificate, it showed that George’s father was Peter George Harris and Rose’s father was Frederick John Hurst.

So armed with the fact that George’s father was ‘Peter George Harris’, I went searching. I found a book, which I think was the South Australian Biographical register (can’t remember the name but I still have the photo copy of the page) and found the following entries.

This showed the family of George Honey Harris and Rose Ann Hurst, along with the names of their children, parents etc. It does have one glaring mistake, the name of Daisy Beecham. This I guess the contributor believed Daisy married someone with the surname of Beecham.  I knew this to be wrong as I had both her birth and marriage certificates, which proved otherwise. By the way, I have not been able to find a marriage between a Harris and Beecham in the SA indexes.

This entry also shows that George’s father was George Peter Harris. Now yes, it’s possible the first and second names were swapped around on the marriage certificate, so maybe it’s the right piece of information.  The next entry that is of interest is further below, which has the details of George Peter Harris and his apparent two marriages.

So without much further to go on, I believed that the information, contained here was correct, though I did keep digging every so often to find more information. It wasn’t until late 2010, when I realised that the information in the book was incorrect. Everyone believes that the George Peter Harris (co-founder of Harris Scarfe) was the father of George Honey Harris.

With access to Ancestry, Trove and a contact with a cousin I was able to discover that there were two George Peter Harris’s living in South Australia around the same time. There was a George Peter Harris and then there is Peter George Harris. I can see where people might get confused and think one is the other, but they are not.

The above entry indicated that ‘George Peter Harris’ had arrived in SA by 1854. Research tells us that yes, he did, but in fact he arrived in February 1849 and co-founded the ‘Harris Scarfe’ store.  Yes, he did marry Caroline Fischer and had two children. This was his only marriage. He also died in London on 1873.

Peter George Harris’ arrived in 1854 along with his family. They are listed in the 1851 census at Guernsey Channel Islands and this showed George Honey’s birth to be closer to 1844 not 1849. His actual birth registration is:

George-Honey Harris
Gender: Male
Birth Date: 06 Jun 1844
Birthplace: Guernsey, Channel Islands
Father’s Name: Peter-Geo. Harris
Mother’s Name: Adelina Bienvenu

Even though I don’t have Peter G’s death certificate I do have a photo of his grave, which has his birth to be the 24th May 1805.  The George Peter Harris was born around 1823 in I believe London. My Great Great Grandfather, Peter was also known as Pierre George.

I’m a little miffed at the moment, that despite all the evidence that we now have, many still believe that our family are related to the G P Harris of Harris Scarfe. We are not. The evidence proves it.

So in summary, you need to put in the effort and obtain the birth, marriage & death certificates of people so that you can then ensure that you are tracing the right tree. Someone might have something in a book or on the internet but how do you know for sure it’s correct without obtaining the evidence?

In my post on the 7th January, I let you know that I had found the marriage of my ancestors Samuel Baldwin and Mary Warren at Polstead, Suffolk in 1804.

With this new found information I contacted my ‘cousin’ and let him know what I found. The finding of the marriage proved our connection. I am descended through Samuel and Mary’s first son, John Baldwin (b1804) and my cousin is descended through another son, Thomas Baldwin, born 1815. He was able to obtain the original copy of the marriage and one of the witness was a Samuel Warren, which I would think is probably Mary’s father.

I am yet to find any other children born to Samuel & Mary between 1804 and 1812 but they did have another 3 children.  The children we know are below and were all born and baptised in St Marys’ Bures, Suffolk,

  • John (1804-1871)
  • Samuel (1813-1816
  • Thomas (1815-1851)
  • Robert (1817-1892)
  • George (1826-1905)

From looking at the Cosford Database, Ancestry and Family Search, everything points to Mary Warren’s parents being Samuel Warren and Ann How. They were married on the 30th November 1779 at Polstead. Though in saying this, it’s possible “How” may not be her maiden name, as the marriage is listed twice, with Ann’s surname also being Townes.

Samuel Warren and Ann How

  • Ann Warren 1780:
  • Mary Warren 1783 -1842: married Samuel  Baldwin in 1804
  • Samuel Warren 1785 – 1845: married Ann Hyham in 1819
  • Susan Warren 1789: married William Elmer in 1819
  • Hannah Warren 1791:
  • Elizabeth Warren 1793 – 1872: married John Green in 1818
  • James Warren 1794:
  • John Warren 1797:
  • Edward Warren 1798 – 1884: married Maria Lambert in 1820 and married Charlotte Rice in 1846.

One tree on Ancestry has posted a photo of a house with the description ‘ Samuel Warren and Ann How’s house’. There is no other description or comments for the photo. Others have copied the photo over to their tree but I am reluctant to do this without further proof confirming that this was the house they had lived in. I’ve sent a message to the person who originally posted the photo and have asked them to let me know where the house is and the name of it. I’m thinking that it’s more than likely that it is in Polstead, considering that’s where they spent their live. But as yet, I haven’t heard from them.

Samuel’s age was listed as being 85 in the UK Census 1841 which would make his birth year to be 1756. But on his death, his age is listed as being 87, which would mean he was born in 1758.

On Family Search there are 3 possibilities for who his parents were:

  • Samuel Warren – born 20 Nov 1756 Suffolk,​England to William and Mary Warren
  • Samuel Warren – christened 15 Feb 1758 Suffolk, to Nathanael Warren, and Sarah Warren
  • Samuel Warren – christened 23 Apr 1758 Layham,​Suffolk,​to Samuel and Elizabeth Warren.

I note that there are some trees on Ancestry that have William & Mary as Samuel’s parents but I’d rather wait to see if I can find further prove before saying for sure that they were his parents.

There appears to have been some tragedy that occurred during March of 1842 in Polstead, because at least 3 members of Warren family died in early March.

Samuel Warren born 1758 – died March 1845. Buried 8 March 1845 at St Mary’s Polstead

Samuel Warren born 1785 – died March 1845. Buried 11 March 1845 at St Mary’s Polstead

Ann Warren (born 1820) married William Munson in 1841 – died March 1845. Buried 7 March 1845 at St Mary’s Polstead, note I’m not sure of who Ann’s parents were. The Cosford database has two Ann Warren’s born in 1820/1821. Maybe they are the one and the same? I would have to obtain the marriage certificate for Ann & William to see the name of Ann’s father.

What’s up Doc?

Posted: January 7, 2012 in Ancestry, Baldwin, FamilySearch, General

Well, firstly not much but did I grab your attention?  If so, keep reading….

I haven’t written a blog since my last entry back in May when I announced that I was going to Gallipoli for Anzac day, well now it’s down to 3 months and 9 days until I fly out.  I’m basically thinking about nothing else.

I didn’t do much research during 2011, just little bits and pieces here and there. I sometimes just wasn’t that interested and haven’t had a lot of time. As I work full time and I only have Sunday’s to research, all I’ve wanted to do is just relax.

I have RSS Google reader so I have been reading lots of blogs. I find I only read the ones that really capture me at the start. In particular News Items and anything that people write about in terms of the research they are doing, what they found and how they went about it. I tend to be reading more Irish & UK blogs more than anything.

This is just a small sample of the blogs that I have read.

Research Update

I did do some work between the Christmas and New Year break, where I found myself basically spending a great deal of time on AncestryUK.  I started searching for some information on my paternal RICHER line. As my father never knew his father, (Frederick George Richer)  I wanted to see if I could find some additional information on the service records for his brothers. I already knew that both Fred and his brother Alfred arrived in Australia around 1913. Alfred’s wife and two children arrived in Brisbane in 1915.  By the time war broke out Fred was in Melbourne and he enlisted in the AIF Field Artillery Brigade 2, Battery 4 in August 1914 whereas Alfred was still in Brisbane and went back to England as an Imperial Reservists. (Middlesex Regiment – Number: 457027) and they both returned to Australia in 1919.

From this I then turned my attention to their older brother James.  By fluke I found a photo of James on one of the Ancestry trees. James married Annie Loader in 1915 and immigrated to Canada in 1919. Now I have something that I can show my dad what his father ‘might have looked like’.

I also spent a lot of time doing other searches for both my Richerl Scutcher and Baldwin families, updating events, timelines, adding census records to my Ancestry trees.  I also found my GGG Grandparents marriage on Family Search, which I had not been able to find previously.

I knew their names from the baptism record of my ancestor John Baldwin, which shows:

“John Baldwin son of Samuel and Mary his wife, late Warren, baptised 21st April 1804”

By putting in Samuel Baldwin as the person I was looking for, including the place as Suffolk and a date range, I received no results. It was only when I put Mary Warren in the marriage came up as follows:

Groom’s Name: Samuel Boldwin
Bride’s Name: Mary Warren
Marriage Date: 19 Mar 1804
Marriage Place: Polstead,Suffolk,England
Indexing Project (Batch) Number: M06302-1
System Origin: England-ODM
Source Film Number: 919627

I would have thought that even putting the surname in as Baldwin, the search function would still have been able to pick up the different spellings.  I know for other surnames, it picks it up, but not for this particular instance.

Books that I plan to read in the next couple of months.  I’m interested in reading anything about WW1, particularly, either Gallipoli or the Western Front

I’m currently reading “Over the Top”.

Bye for now…

Sandra

Well, today I have finally done something I’ve been wanting to do for a long time.  I have booked a trip to Gallipoli for the Anzac Day Service in 2012.  I have been searching for a tour to go on and looking at various options I have finally decided on Mat McLachlan’s Battlefied tours.  Now all I have to do is save, save and save.

I have always had an interest in Gallipoli and the Anzac spirit but since finding out who my paternal grandfather was back in 2002 (my father’ never knew him, as he died when my father was 9 months old and my grandmother was reluctant to talk about him) and finding his WW1 sevice record showed that he had served in Gallipolli, and again in France before being sent back to England for the remainder of the war.

Frederick was born in Essex in 1884 and was living with his mother and brother in 1911. When war broke out Frederick was living in Melbourne and enlisted in the AIF on the 18th August 1914 and joined the 2nd Field Artillery Brigade 4th Battery and left on the HMAT Shropshire on the 20th October 1914, he returned to Australia on the Orantes on the 21st February 1920.

Bye for now..



Last week I visited the NSW State Records at Kingswood and one thing I wanted to check was the Ticket of Leave & Certificate of Freedom for John Showler & Thomas Showler, who were convicts that arrived in 1828 and 1831 respectively.  On the convict indent, Thomas indicates that he had a cousin John already in the colony.  From my previous post back at the end of November last year, I wrote that I thought that maybe John Showler was possibly my ancestor John Shoulders.  Even though I haven’t been able to find any positive proof as yet, I do think that John Showler is John Shoulders, despite the apparent age difference, they were both from Aylesbury Buckinghamshire and secondly John Showler has also been found in some records as John Shoulder. Thomas Showler is also listed on his ticket of leave as being Thomas Shoulders.

Summary of information about John Showler/Shoulders

  •  John Shoulders who married Mary Ryan in 1851, was 40 in 1856 and born at Aylesbury Buckinghamshire. This makes his birth year to be 1816
  •  John Showler age at trial in January 1828, is listed as 21. But on his arrival he is listed as being only 20, making his birth year to be 1807 or 1808
  • John Shoulder listed on the NSW Gaol description Entrance Books (1818-1930) – Admitted to Stone Quarry 8th January 1835 and disposed 4th May 1835
  • John Showler -  Countess of Harcourt 1828 40/0846 15 May 1840 Certificate of Freedom [4/4358; Reel 1006] TL 33/758 
  • John Showler -   Countess of Harcourt 1828 33/758   Ticket of Leave [4/4090; Reel 920] District: Inverary; Tried: Bucks QS
  • John Shoulders – died in May 1858 at Hernani, near Armidale NSW.

The Certificate of Freedom for John Showler is as follows:

Ref:                                       40/486

Date:                                    15/05/1840

Master:                                 Harrison

Ship:                                     Countess of Harcourt

Year:                                     1828

Date of  Trial:                       15/06/1828

Sentence:                             7 years

Height:                                  5 foot 4 & ¾ inches

Complexion:                         Ruddy & Freckled

Hair:                                       Sandy

Eyes:                                     Hazel

General:                                Small Scar left eye, two scars left, IS SH bleeding heart, 1828, wreath hope & anchor on left arm. Man, Woman, Mermaid, SH on right arm.

 

 

I wonder what the IS, SH mean? Were they initials of his parents perhaps or someone else? Thomas also had letters on both his arms, having WICSRTS & EIHPY on his right arm.  On his left arm he had a name L Hawkins.  Could they be clues to other family members?

  

Summary of information about Thomas Showler

  

  • There appears to be no marriage for Thomas Showler (or variant spellings) in the NSW indexes.
  • There are two recorded deaths for ‘Thomas Showler’s, one in 1860 at Cooma and the other in 1897 at Liverpool. From the NSW State Records index, we can see that the Thomas Showler who died in 1897, died at the Liverpool Asylum. 
  •  Thomas Showler   Georgiana 1831 38/1157   Ticket of Leave [4/4121; Reel 930] District: Goulburn; Born: Bucks; Trade: Ploughs; Tried: Bucks QS
  • Thomas Showler is listed on his Ticket of Leave Passport in 1843 as ‘Thomas Shoulders’. (SHOULDERS Thomas - Georgiana 1831 43/314 21 Mar 1843 Ticket of Leave Passport [4/4249; Reel 971]
  •  Thomas Showler -   Georgiana 1831 49/0225 11 May 1849 Certificate of Freedom [4/4412; Reel 1026] TL 39/1157

 

The Certificate of Freedom for Thomas Showler is as follows:

 

Ref:                                       49/225

Date:                                    11/05/1849

Master:                                 Thompson

Ship:                                     Georgina

Year:                                      1831

Date of  Trial:                       4/01/1831

Sentence:                             14 Years

Height:                                  5 foot 9 inches

Complexion:                        Pale & Freckled

Hair:                                      Brown

Eyes:                                    Grey

General:                               Slight diagonal scar and mole on left eyebrow. WICSRTS, 1828, EIHPY on Right arm.  L Hawkins, Sun, JHEVL on left arm.

 

Baptisms Records – Buckinghamshire

Looking at the baptism records for Buckinghamshire, I found the following  ‘POSSIBLE’ baptisms for John Shouler/Shoulders.

  •  23 Dec 1804 John born 26 Nov 1804 son of James & Esther SHOWLER – Aylesbury Buckinghamshire
  • 27 May 1810 John son of Samuel & Ann SHOULER – Padbury Buckinghamshire
  • 1 Jan 1815 John Samuel born 31 Dec 1814 son of John & Mary SHOULER – Whaddon Buckinghamshire

I suspect that the first one in 1804 might be the most likely one considering that this is the only baptism for a John being born in Aylesbury between 1804 & 1816. I cannot be sure if this is the correct one, unless I find some other information on who John’s parents were.

Looking at baptism records, for Thomas Showler, I note the following possibilities.

  • 1 Oct 1797 Thomas born 18 Jun 1797 son of Thomas & Maria SHOWLER – Ayelsbury Buckinghamshire
  • 23 Feb 1798 Thomas born 8 Feb 1798 son of William & Elizabeth SHOWLER – Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire

 

 

 



I have been having a look at the Assessment Books & Sand’s Directories for Newtown for my ancestors Joseph Dilworth, Mary Quirk (later Dilworth) and Mary’s mother’ Catherine Quirk (nee Slattery).  The assessment books are located here: http://www.sydneyarchives.info/rate-books and the Sand’s Directories are located here: http://www.sydneyarchives.info/sands-directories

I was checking to see where Joseph was living in the early 1860’s as in 1857 he sold a property in Australia Street Newtown, as detailed in a previous post.

Joseph does not appear in any of the Sand’s directories for Newtown, but from the assessment books for 1863 Joseph is listed in Horden Street Newtown (O’Connell Ward) and alongside him, Mrs C Quirk (which I believe to be Catherine Quirk – mother of Mary Dilworth, nee Quirk).

Below is a list of the Sand’s Directories and where they were living.  Joseph & Mary had moved out of the area by 1866 (a daughter was born at Cox’s Creek) and Joseph died in 1877. Mary appears to have come back by 1883. She had started a relationship with Michael Milverton by the beginning of 1871, as they had 3 children in the early 1870’s.  Mary & Michael did not marry until 1887.

From looking at the list below, it’s a bit hard to work out why Catherine Quirk was not listed in all of the directories as she appears in 1873 and then does not appear again until 1880, though still living at the same address. Catherine arrived in NSW in 1857 from Kilkenny Ireland, along with daughters Catherine & Margaret. Catherine died in 1891  and is buried at Rookwood Cemetery.

  

Year Name & Address Comments
1863 Mrs Dilworth – Susan Street  I’d say this is Mary Dilworth – nee Quirk
1873 Quirk, Catherine Slattery, laundress – Susan Street, Camperdown & Newtown – West Side Interesting that Catherine’s maiden name was included.
1880  Quirk, Catherine – Susan Street West Side  
1883  Quirk, Mrs. Mary – Enmore road-North side Not sure who this is:  Though Mary Dilworth (nee Quirk) did use her maiden name when she married Michael Melverton in 1887.
1884  24 Quirk Mrs. Susan Street – South Side  
1885  24 Quirk Mrs. Susan Street – South Side  
1886  24 Quirk Mrs. Susan Street – South Side  
1887  24 Quirk Mrs. Susan Street – South Side  
1889  24 Quirk Mrs. Susan Street – South Side  

 

This is a list of my maternal ancestors.  Also, forgive me as I try out different wordpress themes today.

My Maternal Grandmothers Ancestors

  • My Grandmother
    • Catherine Gladys Dilworth –(1900-1980)
  • My Great Grandparents:
    • Charles Patrick Dilworth (1861-1946) & Margaret McCormick (c1862-1932)
  • My Great Great Grandparents
    • Joseph Dilworth (c1807-1887) & Mary Quirk – (1832-1911)
    • Dennis McCormick (c1815-1890 ) & Mary Fitzgerald (c1832-1905)
  • My Great Great Great Grandparents (the ones that I know)
    • John Dilworth & Ruth King (Tyrone Ireland)
    • John Fitzgerald & Johanna (or Hanorah) O’Shaunnessey (Limerick, Ireland)
    • Patrick & Catherine McCormick (or McCormack)
    • John Quirk (1802-c1858, Kilkenny Ireland) and Catherine Slattery(c1811 -1891)
  •  My Great Great Great Grandparents (the ones that I know)
    • James Quirke & Alice Reid (Tipperrary & St Johns Well Kilkenny, Ireland)

My Maternal Grandfather’s Ancestors

  • My Grandfather
    • Herbert William Baker (1903-1958)
  • My Great Grandparents
    • Alfred Baker (1866-1909) and Ellen Mathews (1881-1966)
  • My Great Great Grandparents
    • William George Baker (c1836-1881) and  Susan Baldwin (c1842-1921)
    • George Mathews (c1842 – no known death has been recorded) & Ellen Shoulders (1856-1921)
  •  My Great Great Great Grandparents
    • Samuel Baker & Sarah King (Boxford, Suffolk)
    • John Baldwin (1806 – Bures St Mary Suffolk –died 1871 -) & Sarah Reason (died: 1856)
    • John Shoulders (c1816 Aylesbury Buckinghamshire-died1858) – other spelling of Surname is Shouler or Showler – & Mary ann Hanratty , alias Ryan – (c1835-1909)
  • My Great Great Great Great Grandparents
    • Arthur Hanratty alias Robert Johnston, alias Robert Hanratty, (c1807-?) & Ellen Moran both of Monaghan, Ireland

 

Area’s they were born, lived or died

Surname Places in the England or Ireland Places in Australia
Baker Bures St Mary, Sudbury, Boxford, Suffolk Boggabri New South Wales,Narrabri, New South Wales
Baldwin Bures St Mary, SuffolkAssington, Suffolk Boggabri, New South Wales
Dilworth Tyrone, Ireland Newtown, New South WalesMaitland, New South WalesBoggabri, New South Wales
Mary QuirkQuirke St Johns Well, Kilkenny, IrelandTipperary, Ireland Newtown, New South Wales, Boggabri, New South Wales
Catherine Slattery Tiperrary, Ireland Newtown, New South Wales
Dennis McCormick/McCormack Greenock, Scotland (though believe Dennis to have been born in Armagh Ireland) he was tried in Greenock, but his convict indent says he was from Armagh Ireland Greta, Branxton,Maitland, New South Wales
Mary Fitzgerald Stonehoyle, Limerick , Ireland As above
Mathews   Prospect, New South Wales,Bundarra, New South WalesLaura Station,Bundarra, New South WalesBoggabri, New South Wales
Shoulders/Showler/Shouler Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire Armidale, New South Wales
Hanratty, Henratty Armagh, IrelandTried in Monaghan, Ireland Various places throughout New South Wales

The original idea for this originated from Shelly from the Twigs of Yore. I have been trying to decide which ancestor to choose and which document too choose as there are a few I could have chosen, I have decided though to dicuss my earliest known free immigrant ancestor, Joseph Dilworth.  I do have 5 direct ancestors who arrived as convicts between 1827 and 1839 but the details of these ancestors only came to light in the last few years, whereas the information I have had on Joseph, I obtained almost 20 years ago, when I first began my family history. I’ll be writing about my convict heritage in another post sometime soon.

Joseph Dilworth who was born around 1807 Killyman, Tyrone, Ireland. Jospeh arrived in New South Wales, with his first wife Elizabeth and son Josias Wilison on board the ship Wilson on the 7th January 1842. I am descended through Joseph’s second marriage to Mary Quirk, and they married in March 1857, 3 months after Elizabeth died in 1856. I suspect that Joseph married quickly and only wanted a mother to his fiive children from his first marriage. Joseph & Mary went onto have 6 children, before seperating about 1870 when Mary began a relationship and had 3 children with Michael Melvyton. 

The earliest document that I have is the copy of the shipping record from the Index to Bounty Immigrants Arriving in N.S.W., Australia, 1828-1842. I’ve had this for about 20 years when I printed it off, from the microfilm at the local library.  Back when I first began tracing my family history, all of my research was done at my local library, scouring microfiche, micofilms, books and indexes, which took a lot of time do unlike now.  You can now view the indexes to the Bounty Immigrants arriving in NSW as well as the original image on line for free at Family Search.

The information provided was:

Principal’s Name: Joseph Dilworth Estimated birth year: 1818 Age in years: 24 Native place of Principal: Killyman, Tyrone, Father’s name: John Mother’s name: Ruth Spouse’s name: Elizabeth Dilworth Native place of spouse: Tullaniskan, Tyrone, Spouse’s Father’s name: John Ditty Spouse’s Mother’s name: Nancy Ship: Wilson Date of arrival: 07 Jan 1842.

Have a good Australia Day everyone…

I am sitting here wondering if I should get excited or just stay calm.  I’m wondering if after 20 odd years, I’ve actually found when my ancestor John Shoulders arrived in NSW.

All the information that I know up today, was that he married Mary Ryan (Ryan is on the marriage certificate but actual maiden name was Hanratty), in 1851 at Armidale.

John & Mary had 4 children, of who the youngest Ellen Shoulders was my GG Grandmother.  According to her birth certificate in 1856, John was aged ‘40’ and had been born in Aylesbury Buckinghamshire.

John died in May 1858 at Hernani, New South Wales.  His death certificate stated that he was 42   and had been in the colony for 26 years, making his arrival to be about 1832 and therefore making his age to be about 16 when he arrived. I’ve never been able to find what ship he arrived. With his age and the year of arrival, I always wondered, was he a convict?

A few weeks ago I requested a research service from the Buckinghamshire Family History Society to provide a list of all the baptism’s, burials & marriages for the surname of Shoulders, spanning from 1750-1850 across Buckinghamshire, using all possible variant spellings, including Shouldar, Showler, Shouler, Shouldar. With this, there were a few possibilities with baptisms in Aylesbury ranging from 1804 to 1816.

I then did a search on the NSW State Record Online Index for John, using a number of different variant spellings, which I had not considered doing before.

This is what I find:

  • SHOWLER        John     Countess of Harcourt   1828     33/758  Ticket of Leave            [4/4090; Reel 920]          District: Inverary; Tried: Bucks QS
  • SHOWLER        John     Countess of Harcourt   1828     40/0846  15 May 1840    Certificate of Freedom   [4/4358; Reel 1006]            TL 33/758

I then checked the UK, Prison Hulk Registers and Letter Books, 1802-1849 Record for John Showler and find that he was tried at Aylesbury Buckinghamshire on the 15th January 1828 for stealing bacon, and pork. Another record shows that John was 21 and that he is listed as being in custody before and of ‘bad character’.  His NSW convict indent in 1828 though shows that he was only 20.  He arrived in April 1828 but does not appear in the NSW 1828 Census.

From checking the baptism records a John Showler, the closest possible baptism is one that is recorded in 1804 to parents James & Esther both of Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire.

Despite this John Showler being about 10 years older than John Shoulders, could he actually be John Shoulders?  There are no records of John Shoulders prior to his marriage in 1851 in NSW or any of the other Australian states and apart from the TOL and CF that John Showler received in 1840, there appears so far to be no other record of John Showler in NSW. I note that at this  present time I am in no way confirming that John Showler is John Shoulders but just putting it out there that MAYBE they might be the one and the same. So if you are connected to the Shouler/Showler family in Aylesbury Buckinghamshire, let me know and maybe we might be able to confirm the connection.  I am the type of person who will not confirm a connection until I have positive proof.

I also note that a Thomas Showler, also arrived in 1832 on board the Georgina. On his convict indent, it states that he had a cousin John Showler living in the colony for 3 years.

  • SHOWLER              Thomas                 Georgiana                             1831       38/1157              Ticket of Leave      [4/4121; Reel 930]        District: Goulburn; Born: Bucks; Trade: Ploughs; Tried: Bucks QS
  • SHOWLER              Thomas                 Georgiana                             1831       49/0225                11 May 1849        Certificate of Freedom                [4/4412; Reel 1026]            TL 39/1157

 I’ve also found reference to a James Shoulder born Aylesbury, who had served in the 11th Dragoons. From checking James’ military record on Find My Past, James had enlisted in 1817 and was discharged in 1838.  He is in the 1841 census and living at Aylesbury, also in the household is a Mary Showler (45), Thomas Wheeler (20) and Joseph Freman (10).  The next census I find James is in the 1871 census and he is living at Chelsea London with his wife Elizabeth (60) and with two children Henry (20) and Sophia (19). From checking and comparing the baptism records for Aylesbury, it appears James’s parents were Thomas & Mary or Maria and is ‘possibly’ the brother to Thomas Showler, the convict who arrived here in 1832, as his parents appear to have been Thomas & Maryann.