Posts Tagged ‘FindMyPast’

In Search of the Birth of William George Baker

This is the first post of a series that I intend to write to show my research into finding the UK birth record of my GG Grandfather William George Baker.

William George Baker married Sarah Baldwin in Woolwich Kent in 1863. They came to New South Wales with their young son, William George, on the ship ‘Trebolgan’ in 1865.

On a number of records found here, William’s birth appears to be between 1836 and 1840 and his parents were Samuel & Sarah Baker.

On the shipping records, his age is listed as 27 years old. This makes his birth year to be around 1838. His native place reads Sudbury Suffolk. His parents are listed as Samuel & Sarah, with his mother living at Woolwich England. He is also shown to have ‘an Uncle George King’ living in the colony. I’m have not yet found any record of George King nor have I found a shipping record that matches to a George King coming from Suffolk. I did find a marriage between a Samuel Baker and a Sarah King in 1831 at Boxford, Suffolk. (M13246-1).

On the birth certificate of his son Albert Samuel, in 1870, William was 31, making his birth year to be 1839.

On the birth certificate of his daughter Emma, who was born in 1874, William was listed as 37, making his birth year to be 1837 and born at Bures, Suffolk, England.

On the birth certificate of his son Ernest, born in 1876 he is again shown as being 37, making his birth year to be 1839 and he was born at Bures, Sudbury, Suffolk, England.

On William’s death certificate, his age is listed as 45 born in Sudbury Suffolk. This makes his birth year to be around 1836. His parents are listed as Samuel Baker & Sarah Sampson. (The Sampson, I believe is incorrect or maybe Sarah remarried).

Anything is possible considering the different ages he is across the various documents. He could have been born as early as 1835 but I’m sure he was born in Bures (or surrounding districts) Suffolk.

I have over the years checked parish, civil & census records on FindMyPast, Free BDM, Ancestry UK and as yet not found a definite match.

With the changes on FindMyPast and the ability to now be able to in more detail on the Birth Indexes, I performed a search on William Baker born between 1837 and 1841 and this produced 13 results, 2 of which I can discount due to the child’s middle names, so that leaves the following. The advanced search would be better if you were able to include the names of both sets of parents.

BAKER William Wangford Suffolk 1837
BAKER William Blything Suffolk 1838
BAKER William Hoxne Suffolk 1838
BAKER William Bosmere Suffolk 1838
BAKER William Plomesgate Suffolk 1839
BAKER William Cosford Suffolk 1839
BAKER William Woodbridge Suffolk 1840
BAKER William Woodbridge Suffolk 1840
BAKER William Hartismere Suffolk 1840
BAKER William Hartismere Suffolk 1841
BAKER William Wangford Suffolk 1841

A search using just ‘George Baker’ brings up 9 records, of which one ‘Henry George Baker’ born at Sudbury, Suffolk in 1841 could be a possible relative.

Checking the 1841,1851,1861 UK census finds no record of the family in Suffolk.

I know that some people will not agree with what I’m about to write but the way I see it, if someone reading this learns from my experience then I’ve done my job.

I don’t like Ancestry.com.au

Why you ask? I have really not been a fan of the Australian content on Ancestry at all. From past experience I don’t think the information or indexes are that accurate and I do think that to do your family history in Australia (especially NSW) you have the resources you need at the local library, State Records and other places, not just Ancestry.

I used to use the site to view UK records but as only as ‘pay per view’ subscription but it seems that there is a lot of data that as a ‘pay per view’ subscriber I still cannot see.  I also don’t like the fact that a number of records I saved in my ‘Shoebox’ I can longer access as I don’t have a monthly subscription. I really don’t like the idea of having to pay for something I know I can get elsewhere for free. Take for instance the latest development from Ancestry, ‘Australian Vital Records on Ancestry’.  Though in saying that, there are some sites, that I’m more than happy to pay to view additional data.

I come from the old school of family history research.  I started my research in the late 1980’s.  With this I went to the library and sat in front of a microfiche, looked at microfilm and looked at books that had indexes to check the NSW BDM indexes, sands directories, electoral rolls and immigrant reels.  When I found a birth, marriage or death index that I wanted to get the certificate for, I would then have to order this directly from the NSW BDM Registry, by paper form and then send it via snail post. It cost a lot less than (I think about $8.00) but it would take anything up to 4 weeks to get the requested certificate. When I received it, I would then go back to the library to take another look at the microfiche to gain more details about my ancestor and the search continue. For those that began back then, you will understand. For others, who have only just started in the last few years, there are now plenty of databases and information now available online and it’s a lot easier and quicker to gain information. I think this is great but I find the ‘excitement’ about having these ‘Vital Records’ now online a little hard to take, due to the fact, that they already are on line for most of the Australian states, (except for SA and I think WA).  Yes, for Victoria, you have to pay to view the indexes but that to me is just a small price to pay.  The indexes are also available on CD, (for NSW, SA & Victoria, don’t know about the other states).  To me, I’d still rather take the trip to the library to have a look at the CD or look online and then purchase a transcription of the certificate I’m after than pay Ancestry to look at an image.

If Ancestry, really want people to subscribe to their site then I feel that the actual indexes need to show more data, such as the year, place or even parents’ names that helps a person to identify what they are seeing, so that people can say, “hey, I think that one is my ancestor, I want to see more information or I want to see the image and I’m happy to pay for that”.  Currently for someone who does not have a subscription, all you see for the Australian Vital Indexes, is the name of the person and that’s it.  No location, no year, so for me that it not an incentive to pay to look at an image, especially when I can look at the indexes at http://www.bdm.nsw.gov.au and then make my decision to purchase a transcription of the certificate from an agent.

When it comes to paying for information online, especially for UK information, I’m more than happy to have a subscription, to FindMyPast. (though I only do the ‘pay per view’ as I don’t need a full subscription and I still get all of the information I need)

Yes, you need to register to view the site, but the indexes are free to look at and I just feel that for me FindMyPast is a better experience as there is more information in the index for you to make a choice as to which image you want to view.

Below is a list of just some of the repositories that I have used in my research and yes, some of them you have to subscribe and pay to view images:

Pay to view sites:

www.findmypast.co.uk – I note that they now have the UK Birth Indexes fully searchable. Refer to the blog for more information:  FindMyPastUK Blog

www.findmypast.com.au

www.ihr.com.au – Over 20,000 pages of online records for family history research in New South Wales, Australia. (cost per year $40)

Free Indexes or other sites:

http://www.bdm.nsw.gov.au/ (NSW Birth Death Marriages)

www.records.gov.au (NSW State Records Online Indexes) (I note also that digital copies of the Bounty Immigrants lists, 1838-96, are available for free on the site)

http://www.sydneyarchives.info/ – Newtown Project. Has the full Sands Directories between 1858 & 1932 on line.  If you know your ancestor lived in the Newtown area (like mine) than you have free access to a great source of information.

City of Sydney Archives –  Assessment Books 1845 – 1950 – compiled by the Council as a record of basic information about each building (later, each property) in the city which was liable to pay rates

And of course, my Favourite:

www.familysearch.org and Family Search Pilot site,where a lot more information is now becoming available.

So in summary:

Ancestry.com.au is not the only place to do your family history.  Look at all available records, take the time to do the work, find out what else is available and verify all information that you come across. Get out of your chair and away from your PC and take the time to learn about what other research mechanisms is out there. You never know, you might be pleasantly surprised.

Enjoy your night or day, where ever you are.