52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks #29 Ellen Hanratty Convict, a life of drunkness and larceny

Posted: August 17, 2014 in 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks, Hanratty

My 4x Great Grandmother was possibly Ellen Hanratty or Mohan who was born in Monaghan Ireland. Her age is shown on various records which gives her birth to between 1802 and 1812. I have not found the birth of my 3 x great grandmother, Mary Hanratty but Mary’s death certificate listed her father as Arthur Hanratty. Refer to the bottom of the page for links to other posts about Arthur Hanratty.

Convict indent for Elleanor Hanratty alias Moran

  • Age 24 – catholic
  • Arrived per Edward
  • Where Tried: Monaghan Ireland
  • When: 7th August 1827
  • Offence: Stole money

Eleanor had a life of larceny and drunkness and in 1863 she is reported as living by prostitution; her house was said to be a common resort for low dissipated fellows’

In 1834, Elleanor married Robert/Arthur Hanratty, who she was acquainted back in Ireland. They were tried and convicted in Monaghan Ireland on the same date.

From the New South Wales, Australia, Gaol Description and Entrance Books, 1818-1930, the following entries were found:

Between 1831 and 1842 she is listed at least 10 times that I’ve been able to find in the New South Wales, Australia, Gaol Description and Entrance Books, 1818-1930.

In 1849 Helen/Ellen Moran or Hanretty married a James Dicky. She was listed as a widow (though no death for Arthur/Robert has been found).

From the Maitland Mercury:

12/6/1850

MASTERS AND SERVANTS ACT.-Yesterday two cases under this Act were brought before the bench. The first was Ellen Dickey v. John Walker Foreman. Dickey deposed that she had served Mr. Foreman as domestic servant for seven weeks at 5s. per week, and had only received 10s. in payment; she now claimed a balance of £1 5s. Mr. Foreman said he had paid her in full, having paid 10s. at one payment, and £1 4s. 6d. at another, when settling with her. Dickey said that this lost sum was not for wages, but was part of a sum of £1 12s. 9d. she had placed in Mrs. Foreman’s hands, and which had been repaid to her in four payments, as she described. Mr. Foreman admitted that Mrs. Foreman told him that Dickey had placed £1 11s. 3d. in her hands, but said that this matter he had left between them, and he believed they had settled it ; the payment of £1 4s. 6d. made by him was for wages. He produced a witness, a girl named Elizabeth Snell, who, however, stated that although she saw Mr. Foreman pay Dickey some money, she did not know how much it was, nor did she hear what words passed; Dickey subsequently told her that she was satisfied all but 5s. which Mrs.Foreman charged her with, and which she did not recollect. The bench said that this evidence was not distinct enough to do away with Dickey’s positive oath as to the payment, and they gave judgment for the plaintiff for the sum claimed, with costs.

16/11/1853

DRUNKENNESS.-Yesterday, Ellen Dickey and John Raftery were brought before the bench, charged with drunkenness; they were convicted, and Dickey was fined 5s or 24 hours in the cells, and Raftery 10s. or 48 hours.

19/11/1853

DRUNKENESS – Wednesday Mary Smith, Ellen Dickey, John Jenkins, Mary Minion, and Mary Wightman, were brought before the bench, and were convicted of drunkenness ; Smith and Jenkins were fined 5s. each, or 24 hours in the cells ; Dickey, Minton, and Wightman were fined 10s. each, or 48 hours. Yesterday Joseph Morris and Michael O’Keefe, who had been     summoned to appear on similar charges, failed to ppear when called ; warrants were directed to be issued for their apprehension.

3/10/1855

Obscence Language-Ellen Dickey was yesterday found guilty before the bench, at West Maitlind, with using obscene language, in a public street in West Maitland, on Monday evening and was fined 40s. or   seven days imprisonment in Maitland gaol

Drunkeness -Yesterday James Dickey, Ellen Dickey, and Margret Murphy were found guilty on charges of drunkenness, before the bench at West Maitland James Dickey is fined 20s or forty eight hours in the cells. Ellen Dickey 10s, or twenty four   hours in the cells, and Margaret Murphy was admonished and discharged

6/10/1855

James Dickey, Ellen Dickey, William Heffernan, and John Warren were on Wednesday found guilty, before   the bench, at East Maitland, on charges of drunkenness. The three first defendants were each fined 20s., or 48 hours in the cells, and John Warren was fined 10s., or 24 hours in the cells.

10/10/1855

DRUNKENNESS.-Ellen Dickey, Thomas Wright, and Mary Ann Dawson pleaded guilty on Monday before the bench, at West Maitland, to charges of drunken- ness, and were each fined 2os., or 48 hours in the cells.

Henry Weight, Thomas Bodimar, Robert M’Crea, and Abraham Ashworth pleaded guilty on Monday before the bench, at East Maitland, to charges of drunkenness, The three former were admonished and discharged, and the last fined 10s , or 24 hours in the cells. Yesterday Catherine Conolly, Mary Gleeson, and Owen Dunegan were found guilty before the bench, at East Maitland, on charges of drunkenness; the two females were fined 20s., or 48 hours in the cells; the male prisoner was fined 10s” or 24 hours in the cells.

7/3/1863

Ellen Dickey and Billy (an aboriginal) were brought before the West Maitland bench-the former on Wednesday, and the latter on Thursday- charged with having made use, in a public place, of filthy and disgusting expressions. Ellen Dickey, it was stated, got her living by prostitution; her house was said to be a common resort for low dissipated fellows. This prisoner was fined £5 – the extreme penalty – or three months imprisonment. The fine was not paid. Billy, the black fellow was admonished and discharged.

15/9/1863

Petty Larceny.-Ellen Dickey, an aged female, was brought before the bench at West Maitland, yesterday, charged with stealing some Hour, a tumbler, and a plate, valued at 4s. 8d., the property of Mrs. Collins, innkeeper. Branxton. She was convicted, and sentenced to six weeks’ imprisonment.

Ellen died on the 24/3/1864, her age listed as being 50 and was living at Branxton NSW. The informant on the death was James Thomson, coroner. An inquest had been held on the 30/3/1864 at Branxton. Verdict: Died by Being Suffocated in the mud and shallow water accelerated by Drunkenness.

Sources and other posts:

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